Mad Cow Desease

Category : animal deseases, Beef, dairy industry, export of food, Farming / Food production, food industry, food safety
Mad Cow Deseaseby Andrew Routledgeon.Mad Cow DeseaseThe thing that farmers and industrialists alike are constantly looking for is protein types that the bacteria resident with the rumen will not recognise and therefore will pass through the rumen unaffected into the true stomach where they will passed into the bloodstream through the cows intestine.




 

 

Mbeef-1239184_1920ad cow disease is a classic example of how failure to adhere to the first of the eight principles of food hygiene can cause both dire risk to those who come into contact with meat infected with mad cow disease and cause terrible suffering for cattle. The need to make sure that animals are reared properly includes how and with what they are fed. The exact meaning of this statement will become clear as you read this article. The diligence needed at each and every stage of food production and food preparation is absolutely vital in order to maintain the full integrity of food safety. Below you will find an explanation of mad cow disease that will give you insight and understanding of this terrible disease.

Mad cow disease or Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE for short) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system of cattle of all breeds. It is believed (although not 100% proven) that this disease is caused due to the feeding of animal tissue (usually from cattle by also from sheep or pigs) to cattle.

It is common practice nowadays to feed cattle proteins from animal sources. This may be bone meal, blood meal, brain tissue meal or even feather meal. The reason why cattle are fed animal protein is because the protein levels that are present in most plants are relatively low and some strains of bacteria in the cows rumen break them down into undesirable fatty acids such as butyric acid which are less than ideal for the production of milk and flesh mass on beef cattle. (Acetic acid is best for milk production and propionic acid produces the best muscle mass).

The thing that farmers and industrialists alike are constantly looking for is protein types that the bacteria resident with the rumen will not recognise and therefore will pass through the rumen unaffected by the bacteria and pass into the true stomach where they will passed into the bloodstream through the cows intestine. For this technique to be successful, the farmer must alternate the type of protein given to the cow in its feed so that the bacteria of the rumen will not grow to recognize it and hence metabolise it.

Animal proteins contain prions which are proteins that can change the structure of other proteins that they come into contact with. Factories that make animal protein feed (Often in the far east) are renowned for not adhering to procedure and this can cause fluctuations to happen both in the processing time and temperature levels. You see, if the proteins are properly cooked, they will not cause any damage because when cooked, proteins change their structure.

The effect of eating improperly processed protein feed can cause the prions within the protein of the feed to change the structure of the proteins of the cattles brain and spinal cord. This causes the tissue to become spongy meaning thet there are empty spaces within the tissue where there should have been nervous tissue. This wasting and structural change of the cows brain tissue cause the signals that come from the brain to malfunction causing the cow to appear to have fits and seizures. This condition can take up to five years to develop in the cow.

Although few cases were reported above the norm, in technical terms, this condition can be passed on to humans especially where meat is only lightly cooked (or red in the middle). This disease cost farmers billions of dollars worth of damage , especially in the UK where some six million cattle either died because of the disease or were slaughtered in an attempt to eradicate it.

It is believed that some bad feed is still being exported from the far east, (especially from India).


Author: 

Andy has many years of experience in food preparation, Food Hygiene, Catering and staff Training

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    Andrew RoutledgeJune 2, 2010 at 3:12 pm

    Thanks for your comments. I promise to keep adding content but the blog has many articles that give you info on subjects that we all should know something about. Keep digging. Greetings back, Andy R.

  2. Author

    Andrew RoutledgeJune 2, 2010 at 3:12 pm

    I’m very glad that you like the blog. Thanks for the kind words.

  3. Author

    Andrew RoutledgeJune 4, 2010 at 2:39 pm

    Thanks for your remark. I hope that you come back often. Andy

  4. Author

    Andrew RoutledgeJune 7, 2010 at 1:46 pm

    Thank you for that compliment. Keep coming back because I’m putting up a very important article in the next couple of days.

  5. Author

    Andrew RoutledgeJune 7, 2010 at 1:48 pm

    Thank you very much for your kind words. I very much appreciate your referals. I really do think that it is a subject which people should know more about.

  6. Author

    Andrew RoutledgeJune 9, 2010 at 3:52 pm

    I think that will be OK on condition that you give me the name of the University in question and the HTML address of the blog and an understanding that any usage is for positive purposes only (good intent towards my article). Andy.

  7. Author

    Andrew RoutledgeJune 26, 2010 at 3:35 pm

    Thanks for commenting, I hope to see you back again sometime soon. Andy.

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